Another great bus book

Discussions about all things to do with buses, trucks, and the homes made within them.

Moderator: TMAX

Another great bus book

Postby dburt » Thu Oct 22, 2009 4:02 pm

If you don't have this book, get one from Amazon. I only paid $9 plus $4 shipping for this great used book. It is a treasure trove of pictures and info on ancient, antique, old and vintage buses.

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Wouldn't you like to stumble on a Pickwick sleeper coach bus like this one stuck away in some forgotten warehouse? And for sale- cheap! In excellant unrestored condition, it would even run with a little TLC and tinkering. Ah, it's the stuff bus dreams are made of!
dburt
 
Posts: 811
Joined: Sat Aug 22, 2009 6:53 am
Location: NE Oregon, SW Idaho

Pickwick Sleeper ...

Postby GoodClue » Fri Oct 23, 2009 2:52 pm

As close as I'll get to this amazing vehicle ... a picture of a model ...

http://www.retro1-2-3.com/prodinfo.asp?number=142003100

I went to Amazon and ordered the book ... you lucked out at $9.95 ... I paid $20.

Doug
User avatar
GoodClue
 
Posts: 247
Joined: Mon Feb 23, 2009 2:49 pm
Location: Florissant, Colorado, US

Postby dburt » Fri Oct 23, 2009 6:38 pm

Wow, that is one very cool, impressive model. And the price is pretty big too! I guess I'll just have to look at the picture in the book.
dburt
 
Posts: 811
Joined: Sat Aug 22, 2009 6:53 am
Location: NE Oregon, SW Idaho

Postby Rudy » Sun Nov 22, 2009 5:02 am

I found some info about the Pickwick Sleeper bus but no photos. This photo came from the book (American Buses), which I received as a gift from dburt.

Image


Pickwick Stages was an interurban and long distance carrier based in Los Angeles whose origins can be traced to 1912 and which was an important element in a diversified holding company known as the Pickwick Corp. In the early days Pickwick operated Pierce-Arrow passenger car chassis, stretched and extensively reworked and equipped with locally-built open bodies, The rebuilding work and construction of bodies was undertaken at the company's own shops after 1924, when Pierce's model Z bus chassis came into use. Packard, White, Fageol and other makes were used too. Featured introduced an early as the mid 1920's included reclining seats, kitchens and lavatories.

The first attempts to build up complete buses from purchased parts were apparently made in 1927, and the most spectacular example of this operation was the Nite Coach, first shown to the public in the fall of 1928. The Nite Coach was of all-metal chassis-less construction, based on longitudinal beams on which the body was mounted and from which the axles were hung. There were two levels and intermediate aisle from which passengers could enter 13 interlocking compartments, each accomm odating two people. Each compartment had its own running water, dressing room, storage space, and folding berths, two lavatories and a kitchen being provided elsewhere in the bus (which operated with a crew of three). The purpose of the Nite Coach was to shorten travel times on long western routes by eliminating overnight hotel stops, and the concept was that the buses would be built and owned by Pickwick but leased to local operating companies, as with U.S. Pullman cars on the railroads.

When Pierce-Arrow stopped making the model Z, Pickwick built a factory near Los Angeles and prepared to begin quantity production of Nite Coaches. The depress ion naturally affected the prognosis for the expensive vehicle, and only four more Nite Coaches were built of the original type. In 1930, designer Dwight Austin introduced a day coach version of the design known as the Duplex, about 40 of which were built and sold by the end of 1931. At that time the holding company entered receivership. A substantial interest in the bus operating business had already been sold to Greyhound, which now acquired the balance, and the factory was sold to Dwight Austin. During 1932 he produced a revised Nite Coach design (18 were built) with a newly patented angle drive mechanism and a transverse rear-mounted Waukesha engine, The earlier Nite Coaches and Duplexes had front mounted Sterling engines. But the economic circumstances were not right for the sale or operation of such large, costly buses, and Austin soon turned his efforts to another idea (see Utility Coach).

xxxxxxxx

PICKWICK SLEEPER (US) 1936

Columbia Coach Works (location unknown but most likely near Los Angeles, Ca.)

In spite of its name and purpose, this experimental sleeper coach is not known to have had any connection with the earlier Pickwick bus (q.v.). It was shown in the fall of 1936 and was equipped with two Ford V-8 engines mounted in the rear and driving through a complicated system of shafts to a single rear axle. Perhaps its most distinguishing feature was a mechanical air-conditioning system, one of the first ever used in a bus. There was a plan to organize an operating company with a fleet of these buses, but nothing ever came of that, and the sample bus was sold in 1937 to All American Bus Lines, which also operated two sleeper coaches built by Crown.
User avatar
Rudy
 
Posts: 2762
Joined: Mon Aug 17, 2009 4:01 pm
Location: Strangeweather, Mo.

Pickwicks ...

Postby GoodClue » Sun Nov 22, 2009 12:30 pm

Hello Rudy, thanks for the additional info.
Besides the photos you have, these are all the other pics I could find on a Pickwick, the first five being of two models ...

Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image

Doug
User avatar
GoodClue
 
Posts: 247
Joined: Mon Feb 23, 2009 2:49 pm
Location: Florissant, Colorado, US

Postby Sharkey » Sun Nov 22, 2009 12:56 pm

There is at least one more, used as a background in this page. A full resolution monochrome scan ~could~ be obtained. :wink:
Sharkey
Original Founder
 
Posts: 1363
Joined: Sat Oct 09, 2004 5:00 am

Postby Sharkey » Sun Nov 22, 2009 3:00 pm

Just when you thought the Nite Coach information was played out, the Shark comes through with more...

Image
Quite possibly the oddest buses ever made in the United States were two "observation buffet" cars constructed in the Los Angeles shops of Pickwick Stages in 1928. Named "Cherokee" and "Crow", they featured a tiny kitchen squeezed beneath a raised observation deck and a "conning tower" for the driver, One of these buses is shown on it's assigned route between Los Angeles and San Francisco, where raised seats afforded views of spectacular scenery.

Image
The original design of Pickwick "Nite Coaches", of which only five were built, is represented here by "Morpheus". Two Nite Coaches ran between St. Louis and Kansas City for Pickwick-Greyhound Lines for about six months in 1930 until they were ordered off the road as not meeting the size and weight limits of the Public Service Commission of Missouri. They reappeared later in San Francisco-Portland service. "Morpheus" is pictured next to a Tri-Motor of Western Air Express, one of the predecessors of TWA.

Image
Not a Pullman car, but a bus: a compartment in a Nite Coach made up for overnight travel. Early bus lines, like early air lines, avoided night-time travel, and the Nite Coach was one effort to offer more effective competition to the railroads. The idea was periodically revived in the 1930's, but always foundered on the high operating cost because of the small number of overnight passengers that could be accommodated within legal size limits.

Image
One of the original four Pickwick Nite Coaches at a scenic overlook in Yosemite National Park. Not on the regular route, the park was a popular attraction for charter parties and tour groups.

Image
Buses built by Pickwick, Pioneer, Fageol and Yellow Coach are all visible in this 1934 view of Greyhound's San Francisco shop. The big power plant in the foreground with the instrument panel up high and almost over the radiator, is a six-cylinder Sterling "Petrel", the type of engine used in the original Pickwick Nite Coaches and Duplex day coaches.

(I guess this explains why the engine on the model of the Nite Coach slides out the front, the engine and transmission were mounted on a sub frame that was removeable)

All of these photos and text from Over The Road, A History of Intercity Bus Transportation in the United States by Albert Meier and John P. Hoschek, published by the Motor Bus Society, 1975
Sharkey
Original Founder
 
Posts: 1363
Joined: Sat Oct 09, 2004 5:00 am

Postby dburt » Sun Nov 22, 2009 3:12 pm

Thanks Sharkey!! What great pictures and info! I love that Crow or Cherokee bus with the raised turret for the driver and two levels for the passengers with a kitchen for the "buffet".
dburt
 
Posts: 811
Joined: Sat Aug 22, 2009 6:53 am
Location: NE Oregon, SW Idaho

Postby stuartcnz » Sun Nov 22, 2009 5:49 pm

Was the engine called Sterling, or was it actually an external combustion Sterling engine?
User avatar
stuartcnz
Site Admin
 
Posts: 712
Joined: Fri Dec 19, 2008 9:05 pm
Location: Aotearoa, New Zealand

Pickwick pics ...

Postby GoodClue » Mon Nov 23, 2009 10:01 am

Thanks Sharkey ... great shots ... love the interior pic, I knew they had to have great layouts and interiors ... and thanks for the book title and info ...
Your contributions always informative, entertaining and appreciated ...
Doug
User avatar
GoodClue
 
Posts: 247
Joined: Mon Feb 23, 2009 2:49 pm
Location: Florissant, Colorado, US

Stirling/Sterling

Postby VicH » Sat Dec 05, 2009 4:46 pm

stuartcnz wrote:Was the engine called Sterling, or was it actually an external combustion Sterling engine?


That would certainly have referred to the Sterling make of engine, not the Stirling external combustion engine, which has not yet been used successfully in an automotive application; it has however been used in a few submarines.
VicH
 

Postby stuartcnz » Sat Dec 05, 2009 5:22 pm

That sounds more logical. My understanding of the external combustion engines is that they are not that well suited to variable revs, but are good for constant revs. I had heard that they could be worth considering for developing in marine applications, due to the fact that boats tend to work on set revs anyway and 'Whispergen' have developed them into electricity generators, which have been fairly heavily marketed over the last few years.
User avatar
stuartcnz
Site Admin
 
Posts: 712
Joined: Fri Dec 19, 2008 9:05 pm
Location: Aotearoa, New Zealand


Return to Housebuses & Housetrucks

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest